BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA ANGELINA JOLIE

05-Feb-2019 00:02:25
UN refugee agency (UNHCR) Special Envoy Angelina Jolie visited Bangladesh for the first time where she met with Rohingya refugees and heard their harrowing stories first-hand. UNHCR
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STORY: BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA ANGELINA JOLIE
TRT: 2:25
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ROHINGYA / NATS

DATELINE: 3-5 FEBRUARY 2019, KUTUPALONG CAMP / CHAKMARKUL CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH
SHOTLIST
4 FEBRUARY 2019, CHAKMARKUL CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

1. Wide shot, Jolie with Mujibur and family in room
2. Wide shot, family
3. Med shot, Mujibur and family
4. Various shots, Mujibur speaking to Jolie
5. UPSOUND (Rohingya) Mujibur, Rohingya refugee:
“Our house was burned in Myanmar. The military shot at the people. On the journey my mother was taken.”
6. Close up, child
7. Wide shot, Chakmarkul camp
8. Close up, elderly woman filling water
9. Med shot, women looking out through makeshift shelter
10. close up, woman looking out through makeshift shelter

3 FEBRUARY 2019, CHAKMARKUL CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

10. Wide shot, Jolie speaking to children
11. Close up, woman speaking to Jolie
12. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Hosne, Rohingya refugee:
“God knows when I was in my mother’s womb was the last I was at peace in Myanmar.”
13. Wide shot, Hosne and children in shelter
14. Close up, child
15. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Hosne, Rohingya refugee:
“Without proper justice, we can’t go back to Myanmar. We would rather die here.”
16. Close up, Hosne

5 FEBRUARY 2019, KUTUPALONG CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

17. Wide shots, people walking in camp
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Angelina Jolie, Special Envoy, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR):
“It was deeply upsetting to meet the families who have only known persecution and statelessness their whole lives, who speak of being ‘treated like cattle.’ I am therefore thankful that here in Bangladesh, Rohingya refugees have their existence recognized, and are being provided by the Government and UNHCR with documentation and proof of their identity.”

4 FEBRUARY 2019, CHAKMARKUL CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

19. Wide shot, Jolie speaking to elderly man
20. Close up, Jolie speaking to elderly man
21. Close up, elderly man speaking to Jolie
22. Wide shot, Jolie entering BRAC Community Centre where women meet to discuss sexual and gender-based violence
23. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Farhara, member of focus group at BRAC Community Centre:
“What happened to us, not only to us, but also to our children cannot be forgotten. This is memory was cannot forgotten.”
24. Wide shot, Jolie listening to Farhara
25. Med shot, Jolie and child walking in camp
STORYLINE
UN refugee agency (UNHCR) Special Envoy Angelina Jolie visited Bangladesh for the first time where she met with Rohingya refugees and heard their harrowing stories first-hand.

The Cox’s Bazar District in Bangladesh is now home to nearly one million Rohingya refugees. After decades of persecution and discrimination, many said they feel safe, but their futures remain uncertain – including their ability to return to their homes in safety with citizenship rights.

Twenty-two-year-old Mujibur arrived to Cox’s Bazar in 2016, with this father, seven siblings and his wife. His mother was taken during their flight. She is still in Myanmar.

UPSOUND (Rohingya) Mujibur, Rohingya refugee:
“Our house was burned in Myanmar. The military shot at the people. On the journey my mother was taken.”

Mujibur’s father died of natural causes a few days ago. He said he feels that he has a great deal of responsibility on his shoulders at a young age.

Hosne is a 25-year-old-widow with two young boys, five and three. Her husband was shot in front of her eyes in their home in 2016.

SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Hosne, Rohingya refugee:
“God knows when I was in my mother’s womb was the last I was at peace in Myanmar.”

She said her whole village was burnt down, and they escaped to Bangladesh. She says she would will only return to her Myanmar if the people feel safe and protected.

UNDBITE (Rohingya) Hosne, Rohingya refugee:
“Without proper justice, we can’t go back to Myanmar. We would rather die here.”

The Kutupalong is now the world’s largest refugee camp. Some of the camp’s residents came as early as 1991, but the vast majority arrived since August 2017, as people fled violence and attacks on their homes. Many were killed. The scale of the displacement is now and so large that there are twice as many Rohingya living in exile than in Myanmar itself.

SOUNDBITE (English) Angelina Jolie, Special Envoy, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR):
“It was deeply upsetting to meet the families who have only known persecution and statelessness their whole lives, who speak of being ‘treated like cattle.’ I am therefore thankful that here in Bangladesh, Rohingya refugees have their existence recognized, and are being provided by the Government and UNHCR with documentation and proof of their identity.”

Jolie said all refugees are inherently vulnerable but the Rohingya were also stateless. She said they had been denied their most basic human right, citizenship in their country of birth, adding that some still won’t even call the Rohingya by their rightful name.

Jolie stressed that the responsibility to ensure the rights of the Rohingya people and their return to Rakhine State lies squarely with the government and the authorities in Myanmar.
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