SOUTH SUDAN / WORKSHOP SEXUAL VIOLENCE

12-Mar-2019 00:02:26
Commanders from South Sudan’s army have come together at a workshop hosted by the United Nations Mission in South to develop a new Action Plan to eliminate Conflict-Related Sexual Violence (CRSV) which has been endemic since the civil war broke out in 2013. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / WORKSHOP SEXUAL VIOLENCE
TRT: 2:26
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/ NATS

DATELINE: 12 MARCH 2019, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, UNMISS Women Protection Advisor speaking with room of SSPDF Commanders
2. Various shots, commanders in room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Gabriel Jok Riak, Chief of Defence Forces, South Sudan People’s Defence Forces:
“We should not be seen as repulsive or denying the accusations, but instead we will have to correct of look into the matter and try to come up with amicable solutions. The most important is to refrain from committing such crimes against women and children.”
4. Med shot, Commander listening
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Lieutenant General Frank Mushyo Kamanzi, United Nations Mission in South Sudan Force Commander:
“The UN is well aware that eliminating Conflict-Related Sexual violence involves changing attitudes and behaviours – which often require long periods of time. Nevertheless, it is important to continue addressing it through sustained commitments and actions.”
6. Various shots, workshop
7. SOUNDBITE (English) General Malek Reuben Riak, Deputy Minister of Defence and Veterans Affairs, South Sudan:
“After all, South Sudan’s females are our mothers; they are our wives, they are our sisters, and they are our daughters. Is there a man in his normal senses who would condone such acts against the family member? Absolutely – No.”
8. Wide shot, group photo
STORYLINE
These army commanders have the power to make a real difference to the lives of the women and girls of war-torn South Sudan. They lead tens of thousands of troops belonging to the South Sudan People’s Defence Force in locations across the country.

They have come together in the capital Juba to discuss the challenging issue of conflict-related sexual violence which has been endemic in South Sudan since the civil war erupted in 2013. Many thousands of women and girls have suffered as a result from rape and other forms of sexual and physical violence.

These commanders are focal points within the army for combatting sexual violence and have been brought together to develop a new Action Plan at a special workshop hosted by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan.

The Chief of the Defence Forces is aware of the charges leveled against his institution, including killing and maiming, recruitment of child soldiers, abduction, rape and the occupation of schools and hospitals.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gabriel Jok Riak, Chief of Defence Forces, South Sudan People’s Defence Forces:
“We should not be seen as repulsing or denying the accusations, but instead we will have to correct or look into the matter and try to come up with amicable solutions. The most important thing is to refrain from committing such crimes against women and children.”

The UNMISS Force Commander stressed the need for South Sudan to actively combat sexual violence, which continues to be committed mainly against women and girls.

SOUNDBITE (English) Lieutenant General Frank Mushyo Kamanzi, UNMISS Force Commander:
“The UN is well aware that eliminating conflict-related sexual violence involves changing attitudes and behaviours – which often require long periods of time. Nevertheless, it is important to continue addressing it through sustained commitments and actions.”

Another senior government official pleads with the group to be proactive in dealing with the issue because, as leaders, they can be held responsible for the actions of their juniors.

SOUNDBITE (English) General Malek Reuben Riak, Deputy Minister of Defence and Veterans Affairs, South Sudan:
“After all, South Sudanese females are our mothers; they are our wives, they are our sisters, and they are our daughters. Is there a man in his normal senses who would condone such acts against the family member? Absolutely – No.”

South Sudan is a signatory to a number of international and regional laws dealing with the prevention of conflict-related sexual violence and its own constitution and penal code expects its citizens – military and civilians alike – to stop the abuse of women and girls and treat them with the respect they deserve.
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