IFAD / BUTHAN CLIMATE CHANGE

29-Nov-2019 00:03:03
As world leaders prepare to gather in Madrid for the COP25 climate change conference, Italian celebrity chef Carlo Cracco visits Bhutan to see how a changing climate is forcing farmers to adapt how they grow key ingredients of their traditional cuisine. IFAD
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STORY: IFAD / BHUTAN CLIMATE CHANGE
TRT: 3:03
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ITALIAN / DZALA / NATS

DATELINE: 17 OCTOBER 2019, BUMDELING, TRASHI YANGSTE, EASTERN BHUTAN
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, Bumdeling, Trashi Yangste, Eastern Bhutan
2. Wide shot, Trashi Yangtse with mountains in background
3. Wide shot, Chef Cracco and Thukten Wangmo collecting urka bangla peppers
4. Med, shot, Thukten picking peppers pan up to Cracco
5. Close up, picking a pepper
6. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“The main problem they have here is due to climate change, short but intense rainfalls, the river swelling and flushing away their rice. Before there were rice fields down there, but now they can’t cultivate anything.”
7. Wide shot, river valley
8. Close up, water and soil erosion
9. Close up, Thukten walking on farming area on higher land
10. Med shot, Cracco in vegetable garden
11. Close up, Cracco and marrow
12. UPSOUND (Italian) Carlo Cracco:
“Wow a marrow; there is everything here.”
13. Med shot, rice and dragon flies to show biodiversity
14. Wide shot, cabbage field
15. Close up, healthy cabbage plant
16. Med shot, Cracco and Thukten cooking
17. Close up, Cracco holding an urka bangla pepper
18. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“This is the original pepper, urka bangla which is used to make ema datshi which is exceptionally good sauce.”
19. Med shot, cutting peppers Upsound Thukten “We remove the inside part and the seeds”
20. Med shot, Finger Millet
21. SOUNDBITE (Dzala) Thuketn Wangmo, Farmer:
“I prefer millet over rice or any other crops. Because this finger millet has multiple uses. We can make dough, porridge, use to to brew alcohol and as fodder for cattle. whereas rice is only used for food.”
22. Med shot, Chef Cracco and Thukten grinding millet
23. Various shots, making millet momos dumplings
24. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“They are living in symbiosis with what is around them, they don’t try to eliminate or get rid of anything, but to live with it.”
25. Close up, serving food
26. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“This is beautiful and it is something that I will take home.”
27. Wide shot, Cracco and farmers eating
STORYLINE
As world leaders prepare to gather in Madrid for the COP25 climate change conference, Italian celebrity chef Carlo Cracco visits Bhutan to see how a changing climate is forcing farmers to adapt how they grow key ingredients of their traditional cuisine.

With over 70 per cent of its forest still intact, Bhutan, is the only carbon negative country in the world. But lying in the foothills of the Himalayas, between China and India, farmers here are feeling the impact of unpredictable weather patterns.

Thukten Wangmo is showing Chef Cracco how this changing climate is also changing the way farmers, like her, grow their foods.

SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“The main problem here is climate change, these short but intense rainfalls, the river swelling and flushing away their rice. Before there were rice fields down there, but now they can’t cultivate anything.”

When flash floods washed away her paddy fields, Thukten lost all her income and was forced to abandon the lands near the river and build terraces on higher land.

With the uncertain climate, Thukten realised that she could no longer rely on a single crop. She needed to diversify her produce, so if one type failed she had others to fall back on. Through a government project funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), she was provided with a variety of indigenous seeds. These hardy native plants are more resilient to periods of drought or heavy rain.

She also received training on sustainable farming practices, promoting biodiversity and enriching soils through natural processes. Healthy soils help mitigate the effects of climate change as they retain moisture better, resist erosion and produce stronger crops, They also help reverse climate change by absorbing and storing large amounts of carbon dioxide.

While rice used to be Thukten’s only source of income, she has found that there is also a demand for these indigenous peppers called urka bangla - especially as they are the key ingredient in Bhutan’s national dish ema datshi.

UPSOUND (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“This is the original pepper urka bangla which is used to make ema datshi, which is this exceptionally good sauce.”

Another crop that is gaining in popularity is millet. Thukten says this local variety called finger millet is hardier, more nutritious and more versatile than other cereals.

SOUNDBITE (Dzala) Thuketn Wangmo, Farmer:
“I prefer millet over rice or any other crops. Because this finger millet has multiple uses. We can make dough, porridge, use to brew alcohol and as fodder for cattle. Whereas rice is only used for food.”

Chef Cracco helps Thukten grind the millet to make flour for the dough, which they use to make millet momos, dumplings filled with vegetables and cheese.

UPSOUND (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“They are living in symbiosis with what is around them, they don’t try to eliminate or get rid of anything, but to live with it and this is beautiful, and it is something that I will take home.”
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