AFGHANISTAN / NOMADS COVID-19

26-Jun-2020 00:03:36
Up to 1.5 million Afghan nomads face hunger and hardship due to the extended lockdown in Afghanistan. For the last 3 months, the Kuchi nomadic tribes have been left with little income and a shortage of food. The closure of the main markets has left them few places to trade and earn a living. IFAD
Size
Format
Acquire
514.25 MB
1080p/29.97
514.38 MB
1080i/29.97
515.16 MB
1080i/25
DESCRIPTION
STORY: AFGHANISTAN / NOMADS COVID-19
TRT: 3:36
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: EMBARGOED MONDAY 29 JUNE 00:01 GMT
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / PASHTU / NATS

DATELINE: 17-18 MAY – 24 JUNE 2020, PARWAN AND KABUL PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN
SHOTLIST
1 Aerial of Kuchi grazing area, Kabul Province, Afghanistan.
2. Kuchi herding goat
3. Drone shot of herd
4. Kuchi herding sheep
5. POV shot herding sheep
6. Kuchi tents in camp
7. Kuchi tribesman and vet standing with Sheep
8. Close up, elderly tribesman with mask on with herd
9. Young child in front of Kuchi tent
10. Young Kuchi girl foreground, tents background
11. SOUNDBITE (Pashtu) Mir Baaz Amir Ali Khel, Kuchi Tribe IQ:
“Covid-19 has affected us a lot, …OQ: to sell our products.”
12. Close up, herdsman making cheese
13. Close up, cheese
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Candra Samekto, IFAD country programme manager, Afghanistan:
“IQ: The Kuchi people …..OQ: before the crisis.”
15. Drone shot of sheep and goats
16. Close up, goat
17. Young boy herding goats and sheep
18. SOUNDBITE (Pashtu) Mir Baaz Amir Ali Khel, Kuchi Tribe IQ:
“Where would we get information ……OQ: we watch TV?”
19. Drone shot CLAP vets showing Kuchi Covid 19
20. Various shots, vets with masks teaching Kuchi
21. Close up, Covid 19 leaflet
22. Aerial of Covid 19 teaching lesson
23. Kuchi nomads sitting with masks on listening to teachers
24. Close up, Baaz Amir leader sitting listening
25. CLAP trained vet in store room
26. Medicines in store room
27. Line of Kuchi tribesmen, one adjusting mask.
28. Close up, tribesman wearing mask
29. Close up, woman washing hands with soap
30. Wide shot, woman washing hand with another woman and child watching
31. SOUNDBITE (Pashtu) Mir Baaz Amir Ali Khel, Kuchi Tribe IQ:
“It's because of this project's assistance. … spread of this virus.”
32. Wide shot, Kuchi with sacks of food
33. Med shot, carrying sacks away
34. Wide shot, herding sheep
35. Close up, goat eating
36. Close up, goat face being milked
37. Wide shot, goat being milked
38. Close up, udders of goat
39. Med shot, woman milking goat
40. Wide shto, chidlren with herd
41. Aerial of sheep and village
STORYLINE
Up to 1.5 million Afghan nomads face hunger and hardship due to the extended lockdown in Afghanistan.

For the last 3 months, the Kuchi nomadic tribes have been left with little income and a shortage of food. The closure of the main markets has left them few places to trade and earn a living. Border closures have also led to a huge increase in some food prices. In the last three months, the prices of some products like rice and sugar have risen by a third, making it harder for them to afford the basic essentials.

The Kuchi are amongst the poorest and most marginalized groups in the country. They normally make their living by herding sheep and goats, but the COVID-19 pandemic has cut off their income.

SOUNDBITE (Pashtu) Mir Baaz Amir Ali Khel, Kuchi Tribe:
“COVID-19 has affected us a lot; we can't sell our milk, yogurt or cheese. All the shops are closed so we don't have anywhere to sell our products.”

Restricted movement has forced the Kuchis to trade locally, rather than in the main cities. This has led to them fetching much lower prices for their meat products.

SOUNDBITE (English) Candra Samekto, IFAD country programme manager, Afghanistan:
“The Kuchi people already face some challenges due to the climate change and the degraded environment conditions. Now with the outbreaks and imposed lockdown, they cannot access the market anymore. It means that they have to sell their products, their livestock, at much, much lower prices. For example, in the Nangarhar and Logar areas, they have to sell their livestock at 40 per cent less than the price they can get before the crisis.”

Continuing to herd has also increased their chances of being exposed to the coronavirus. And, as many cannot read or write, getting access to information about COVID-19 has been extremely difficult.

SOUNDBITE (Pashtu) Mir Baaz Amir Ali Khel, Kuchi Tribe:
“Where would we get information about COVID-19? We don't have television, we don't even have power, so how could we watch TV?”

When COVID-19 hit back in March, the Community Livestock and Agriculture Project, known locally as CLAP, stepped in to help. Jointly funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development, or IFAD, and the Afghan government, they trained up local field workers and vets to teach the tribe about protecting themselves from the virus using pictures, instead of words. They also provided hygiene and health safety kits, including masks and soaps, to 48 thousand Kuchi families.

SOUNDBITE (Pashtu) Mir Baaz Amir Ali Khel, Kuchi Tribe:
“It's because of this project's assistance – the soaps, masks and other materials they've given us – that we've prevented the spread of this virus.”

Decades of conflict and drought have destroyed the Kuchis’ grazing areas and increased animal diseases in their herds. The current pandemic has also seen their source of income cut dramatically.

Afghanistan has extended its lockdown for three more months, posing a huge threat to the nomads’ health and livelihoods. Afghanistan has reopened some markets, but they are hard for the Kuchis to access. The project is now helping the tribe ramp up their production of more shelf-stable products like ghee, a clarified butter that can be sold when more markets reopen. With new products to sell, the Kuchis hope they will be more resilient to future crisis.

Like millions of small-scale farmers and livestock keepers around the world, the Kuchis are directly impacted by the lockdown measures. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), along with its other UN counterparts, has alerted that the health crisis could turn into a food crisis.

In April, IFAD launched the Rural Poor Stimulus Facility, a new fund to help farmers and rural communities continue growing and selling food, and in particular, to access inputs, information, markets and liquidity.

Since 2015, the Community Livestock and Agriculture Project (CLAP) has established 52 veterinary field units and trained Kuchis to become para-veterinarian and basic veterinarian workers. They provide vaccination, deworming and treatment for the Kuchis’ small ruminants in seven provinces of the country. Animal health has improved and mortality rates have dropped from 15 per cent to 6.2 per cent. This has led to higher productivity, a 50 per cent increase in milk production and a 24 per cent increase in herders’ incomes.

Since March, the CLAP team have been working to teach the Kuchis how to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, in an effort to make them more resilient to future health and climate shocks.

The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is an international financial institution and a specialized agency of the United Nations dedicated to eradicating poverty and hunger in rural areas of developing countries.
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed200626h