WHO / COVID-19 UPDATE

26-Jun-2020 00:03:06
The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) Tedros Ghebreyesus said to bring COVID-19 under control, it is clear that “we need effective vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics – in unprecedented quantities and at unprecedented speed.” WHO
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STORY: WHO / COVID-19 UPDATE
TRT: 3:04
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 26 JUNE 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
FILE – GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, United Nations headquarters exterior

26 JUNE 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
"It’s clear that to bring COVID-19 under control, and to save lives, we need effective vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics – in unprecedented quantities and at unprecedented speed. And it’s clear that because all people are at risk of COVID-19, all people should have access to all the tools to prevent, detect and treat it – not only those who can afford to pay for them.”
4. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
"Two months ago, I joined President Emmanuel Macron, President Ursula von der Leyen and Melinda Gates to launch the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator - a global initiative between multiple partners to ensure equitable access to life-saving tools for COVID-19."
6. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Director-General’s Special Envoy for the ACT-Accelerator, World Health Organization (WHO):
"A total need of 31.3 billion USD has been estimated through scenarios and assumptions discussed within the pillars and contained within their own separately published costed plans. Total needs are estimated for low and middle-income countries over 12 months for Therapeutics and Diagnostics, and 18 months for vaccines. At this point the estimates do not include the Health Systems Connector."
8. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Director-General’s Special Envoy for the ACT-Accelerator, World Health Organization (WHO):
"Many governments and companies have signalled commitment to the ACT-Accelerator and made financial pledges. To date, contributors have committed a total of 11 billion USD of which 3.4 billion was for the three product pillars and an additional 1.7 billion for the Health Systems Connector of the ACT-Accelerator."
10. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Witty, Director-General’s Special Envoy for the ACT-Accelerator, World Health Organization (WHO):
"Until we start to see data coming in from the significant human trials, and as you've heard from Soumya (Swaminathan, WHO Chief Scientist), there are probably 10 or 15 vaccines, which are already at that phase. Until we start to see that data come in, it's really difficult to differentiate, you know, whether we have a vaccine that's going to work well, whether some are going to work better than others, what the exact profiles are of those vaccines. So, it's important to think about the world effort here, really as a portfolio of research efforts. The good news is, it's quite a diversified portfolio."
12. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Witty, Director-General’s Special Envoy for the ACT-Accelerator, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It's still very early days in this journey. We may be super lucky, which would be terrific and have an early win, but we also need to be ready for things taking, you know, as you heard 12 to 18 months to make something happen, and even if it took 12 to 18 months, that would be without precedent the world's fastest development of a vaccine."
14. Wide shot, WHO officials at press conference
STORYLINE
The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) Tedros Ghebreyesus said to bring COVID-19 under control, it is clear that “we need effective vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics – in unprecedented quantities and at unprecedented speed.”

In a press conference in Geneva today (26 Jun) Tedros said all people are at risk of COVID-19, and as such, “all people should have access to all the tools to prevent, detect and treat it – not only those who can afford to pay for them.”

Tedros said he joined President Emmanuel Macron, President Ursula von der Leyen and Melinda Gates two months ago to launch the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator – “a global initiative between multiple partners to ensure equitable access to life-saving tools for COVID-19." The ACT-Accelerator brings together governments, health organizations, scientists, businesses, civil society, and philanthropists who have joined forces to speed up an end to the pandemic.

The ACT-Accelerator had published its consolidated investment case today, alongside the costed plans of the member organizations.

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Tedros’s Special Envoy for the ACT-Accelerator, said a total need of 31.3 billion USD has been estimated through “scenarios and assumptions discussed within the pillars, and contained within their own separately published costed plans.” She said, “Total needs are estimated for low and middle-income countries over 12 months for Therapeutics and Diagnostics, and 18 months for Vaccines. At this point the estimates do not include the Health Systems Connector."

Okonjo-Iweala said many governments and companies have signalled commitment to the ACT-Accelerator and made financial pledges. She said, “To date, contributors have committed a total of 11 billion USD of which 3.4 billion was for the three product pillars and an additional 1.7 billion for the Health Systems Connector of the ACT-Accelerator."

Andrew Witty, also Tedros’s Special Envoy for the ACT-Accelerator, said, until the data starts coming it, it is “really difficult” to differentiate “whether we have a vaccine that's going to work well, whether some are going to work better than others, what the exact profiles are of those vaccines.” He added, “So, it's important to think about the world effort here, really as a portfolio of research efforts. The good news is, it's quite a diversified portfolio."


Witty said it is still early days in the journey to a vaccine. He said, “We may be super lucky, which would be terrific and have an early win, but we also need to be ready for things taking, you know, as you heard 12 to 18 months to make something happen, and even if it took 12 to 18 months, that would be without precedent the world's fastest development of a vaccine."
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