UN / CLIMATE BIODIVERSITY POLLUTION

18-Feb-2021 00:03:59
Launching a major report on the environment, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said, “Without nature’s help, we will not thrive or even survive.” For too long, he added, "we have been waging a senseless and suicidal war on nature.” UNIFEED
Size
Format
Acquire
569.09 MB
1080p/29.97
569.47 MB
1080i/29.97
570.91 MB
1080i/25
DESCRIPTION
STORY: UN / CLIMATE BIODIVERSITY POLLUTION
TRT: 3:59
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 18 FEBRUARY 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, United Nations Headquarters

18 FEBRUARY 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2.Wide shot, press briefing room
3.SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“I want to be clear. Without nature’s help, we will not thrive or even survive. For too long, we have been waging a senseless and suicidal war on nature.”
4. Wide shot, presser
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“We must reflect nature’s true value in all our policies, plans and economic systems. With a new consciousness, we can direct investment into policies and activities that protect and restore nature and the rewards will be immense. It’s time we learned to see nature as an ally that will help us achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.”
6. Wide shot, presser
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“One key moment occurs tomorrow, when I will welcome the United States of America back into the Paris Agreement on climate change. This strengthens global action. President Biden’s commitment to net zero emissions means that countries producing now two-thirds of global carbon pollution are pursuing the goal of carbon neutrality by 2050.”
8. Wide shot, presser
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“Developing countries need more assistance. Only then can we protect and restore nature and get back on track to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. This report shows that we have the knowledge and the ability to meet these challenges. The path to a sustainable economy exists -- driven by renewable energy, sustainable food systems and nature-based solutions.”
10. Wide shot, presser
11. Soundbite (English) Inger Andersen, Director General, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP):
“This new report as we just heard from UNEP ‘Making Peace with Nature’ provides the most compelling scientific case yet for why we have to tackle the three planet’s crises that we just heard the Secretary-General outlined: Climate, Nature and Pollution, and we have to tackle them as one linked challenge. The report gathers the sum of knowledge from major scientific assessments to deliver one clear unified message ‘we are destroying the planet placing our own health and prosperity at risk.’”
12. Wide shot, presser
13. Soundbite (English) Inger Andersen, Director General, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP):
“Crucially, we can achieve rapid progress by addressing the three crises together not in fragmentation. The meeting in Paris requires a rapid transformation in energy systems, in land use, in agriculture, in forest protection and a novel development in infrastructures and lifestyles. All of which would have positive impact on climate on pollution and on biodiversity.”
14. Wide shot, presser
15. Soundbite (English) Inger Andersen, Director General, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP):
“There is indeed no precedent for what we have to do, but if 2020 was a disaster, let 2021 then be the year when humanity began making peace with nature and secure a fair, just and sustainable future for everyone.”
16. Wide shot, reporters
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“We are close to a point of no return. It is obvious that – just to give an example – temperature rise has already reached 1.2 degrees, so if we want to keep it 1.5 until the end of the century it is clear that we are very close to the point of no return.”
18. Wide shot, Secretary-General leaving the presser
STORYLINE
Launching today (18 Feb) a major report on the environment, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said, “Without nature’s help, we will not thrive or even survive,” adding in “For too long, we have been waging a senseless and suicidal war on nature.”

According to the UNEP report, the world can tackle the climate, biodiversity and pollution crises together, but the UN chief said that these interlinked crises require “urgent action from the whole of society”.

Noting that some two-thirds of global CO2 emissions are linked to households, he underscored that “people’s choices matter”.

He explained that “we are overexploiting and degrading the environment on land and sea. The atmosphere and the oceans have become dumping grounds for our waste. And governments are still paying more to exploit nature than to protect it”.

The UN chief underlined, “We must reflect nature’s true value in all our policies, plans and economic systems. With a new consciousness, we can direct investment into policies and activities that protect and restore nature and the rewards will be immense. It’s time we learned to see nature as an ally that will help us achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.”

This year, beginning with next week’s UN Environment Assembly, a number of key international environmental conferences – including on climate change, chemicals, biodiversity, desertification and oceans – can help to propel us on the path to sustainability, the UN chief said.

“One key moment occurs tomorrow, when we welcome the United States of America back into the Paris Agreement on climate change”, he highlighted, noting that the move “strengthens global action”.

“President Biden’s commitment to net zero emissions means that countries producing two-thirds of global carbon pollution are pursuing the goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. But we need to make this coalition truly global and transformative”, he added.

If adopted by every country around the world, a global coalition for carbon neutrality by 2050 can still prevent the worst impacts of climate change.

“But there can be no delay. We are running out of time to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C and build resilience to the impacts to come”, he asserted.

Guterres also said, “Developing countries need more assistance. Only then can we protect and restore nature and get back on track to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. This report shows that we have the knowledge and the ability to meet these challenges. The path to a sustainable economy exists -- driven by renewable energy, sustainable food systems and nature-based solutions.”

Presenting the report, Inger Andersen, Director General of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) said, “This new report as we just heard from UNEP ‘Making Peace with Nature’ provides the most compelling scientific case yet for why we have to tackle the three planet’s crises that we just heard the Secretary-General outlined: Climate, Nature and Pollution, and we have to tackle them as one linked challenge. The report gathers the sum of knowledge from major scientific assessments to deliver one clear unified message ‘we are destroying the planet placing our own health and prosperity at risk.’”

She added, “Crucially, we can achieve rapid progress by addressing the three crises together not in fragmentation. The meeting in Paris requires a rapid transformation in energy systems, in land use, in agriculture, in forest protection and a novel development in infrastructures and lifestyles. All of which would have positive impact on climate on pollution and on biodiversity.”

UNEP’s Inger Andersen also said, “There is indeed no precedent for what we have to do, but if 2020 was a disaster, let 2021 then be the year when humanity began making peace with nature and secure a fair, just and sustainable future for everyone.”

Asked if it is too late already to revert the climate crisis, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said, “We are close to a point of no return. It is obvious that – just to give an example – temperature rise has already reached 1.2 degrees, so if we want to keep it 1.5 until the end of the century it is clear that we are very close to the point of no return.”

The report spotlighted the importance of changing mindsets to find political and technical solutions that equal the environmental crises.

“The path to a sustainable economy exists – driven by renewable energy, sustainable food systems and nature-based solutions. It leads to an inclusive world at peace with nature”, said Mr. Guterres, emphasizing that “this is the vision we must all adopt”. The UN chief encouraged everyone to use the report to “re-evaluate and reset our relationship with nature”.

Making Peace with Nature draws on global assessments, including those from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), UNEP reports and new findings on the emergence of zoonotic diseases, such as COVID-19.
Category
Personal Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed210218c