SOUTH SUDAN / BUDGET PROPOSALS

11-Oct-2021 00:05:31
The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and the South Sudan Democratic Monitoring and Engagement Observation Programme jointly hosted a workshop in the capital city, Juba, to discuss a cogent topic: People’s participation in the national budget process to enhance public ownership of national resources thereby boosting delivery of much-needed services for all communities. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / BUDGET PROPOSALS
TRT: 5:31
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 07 OCTOBER 2021, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, participants in room
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Bennett, Head, Political Affairs, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“State funds belong to citizens themselves but without the means to view how they’re spent the public can never fully consider themselves the masters of their government. Popular participation in the national budget is an essential part of economic reform and a prerequisite in facilitating transparency and accountability. It shows ownership of public resources by the people and facilitates prudent management and efficient service delivery. Consequently, it is both right and necessary that the recent progress in the Peace Agreement implementation be accompanied by a broadening and deepening of fiscal transparency.”
3. Various shots, participants at workshop
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Nathaniel Oyet, Deputy Speaker, South Sudan:
“The budget process comes within the context of peace implementation. The Agreement, inter alia, provides benchmarks for reforms, not only in security or political sectors but also in the economic and financial sectors. Discussing the budget, in this aspect, feeds in to the grand, overarching objective in the Agreement aimed at reforming our economic and financial sector. The Agreement comes with a huge responsibility a responsibility of reconstruction of the country. The country has been devastated. We lost significant volume of infrastructure and lives. We have displaced populations.”
5. Various shots, participants at workshop
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Bennett, Head, Political Affairs, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“In this regard the role of civil society organizations and civic groups in building partnerships with the legislature is vital for realizing budget transparency. Measures focused on enhancing, in particular, the participation of underrepresented groups such as women, youth and disabled people by creating an enabling environment for their participation should be mainstreamed into these mechanisms.”
7. Various shots, more participants
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rebecca Joshua Okwaci, Chief Whip Designate, South Sudan:
“I’m happy to be in the Parliament this time and as a member of Parliament, I believe in oversight. The parliament also represents the will of the people. [cut] Therefore, I believe in the role of the Parliament in scrutinizing the budget and also ensuring that the voices of the people, the needs of the people are represented in the budget. Also, I believe that the role of the Parliament in debating the budget is very, very important. [cut] Involving the voices of the people is very important because it’s part of our function to give them a space to express what they want.”
9. Various shots, participants listening to updates on how budgets are made
STORYLINE
The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and the South Sudan Democratic Monitoring and Engagement Observation Programme jointly hosted a workshop in the capital city, Juba, to discuss a cogent topic: People’s participation in the national budget process to enhance public ownership of national resources thereby boosting delivery of much-needed services for all communities.

Ten years after gaining independence, South Sudan is finally, on the brink of ushering in a truly democratic era for its citizens as it emerges from the devastation of past civil wars and begins preparing for elections as stipulated in the Revitalized Peace Agreement.

A large part of the Agreement revolves around necessary reforms in the country’s financial and economic structure to ensure sustained development.

SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Bennett, Head, Political Affairs, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“State funds belong to citizens themselves but without the means to view how they’re spent the public can never fully consider themselves the masters of their government. Popular participation in the national budget is an essential part of economic reform and a prerequisite in facilitating transparency and accountability. It shows ownership of public resources by the people and facilitates prudent management and efficient service delivery. Consequently, it is both right and necessary that the recent progress in the Peace Agreement implementation be accompanied by a broadening and deepening of fiscal transparency.”
Bennett’s words are echoed by Nathaniel Oyet, Deputy Speaker.

SOUNDBITE (English) Nathaniel Oyet, Deputy Speaker, South Sudan:
“The budget process comes within the context of peace implementation. The Agreement, inter alia, provides benchmarks for reforms, not only in security or political sectors but also in the economic and financial sectors. Discussing the budget, in this aspect, feeds in to the grand, overarching objective in the Agreement aimed at reforming our economic and financial sector. The Agreement comes with a huge responsibility a responsibility of reconstruction of the country. The country has been devastated. We lost significant volume of infrastructure and lives. We have displaced populations.”

In August this year, the Parliament and the Transitional National Legislature were reconstituted. This brought a renewed hope for enactment of several pieces of key legislation necessary to facilitate the reform and transformation agenda contained within the Peace Agreement. The passage of the national budget is one of the priority issues that the Parliament is expected to address in the coming weeks. This timely workshop explores the ways in which South Sudanese civil society can usher in transparency, accountability and efficient fiscal management across the country.

SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Bennett, Head, Political Affairs, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“In this regard the role of civil society organizations and civic groups in building partnerships with the legislature is vital for realizing budget transparency. Measures focused on enhancing, in particular, the participation of underrepresented groups such as women, youth and disabled people by creating an enabling environment for their participation should be mainstreamed into these mechanisms.”

It is globally recognized that budgeting and finances are the cornerstones of a successful state. Budget transparency has, in recent decades, come to be seen as a pillar of good governance. For South Sudan, it is an urgent need so that citizens can finally reap peace dividends.

SOUNDBITE (English) Rebecca Joshua Okwaci, Chief Whip Designate, South Sudan:
“I’m happy to be in the Parliament this time and as a member of Parliament, I believe in oversight. The parliament also represents the will of the people. [cut] Therefore, I believe in the role of the Parliament in scrutinizing the budget and also ensuring that the voices of the people, the needs of the people are represented in the budget. Also, I believe that the role of the Parliament in debating the budget is very, very important. [cut] Involving the voices of the people is very important because it’s part of our function to give them a space to express what they want.”

South Sudan is currently running on an extended budget.
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