UN / COVID-19 TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS

29-Nov-2021 00:02:28
In a statement read by his spokesperson, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the people of Africa “cannot be blamed for the immorally low level of vaccinations available on the continent – and they should not be penalized for identifying and sharing crucial science and health information with the world.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / COVID-19 TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS
TRT: 2:28
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 29 NOVEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Close up, UN flag outside headquarters

29 NOVEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, spokesperson at podium
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesperson for the Secretary-General, United Nations:
“In a statement we issued a bit earlier this morning, the Secretary-General commended the Government and scientist and health community of South Africa for acting early to identify the emergence of a new COVID-19 variant. The Secretary-General said he is now deeply concerned about the isolation of southern African countries due to new COVID-19 travel restrictions. As he and others have long warned, low vaccine rates are a breeding ground for variants. The people of Africa cannot be blamed for the immorally low level of vaccinations available on the continent – and they should not be penalized for identifying and sharing crucial science and health information with the world. The Secretary-General appeals to all governments to consider repeated testing for travelers, together with other appropriate and truly effective measures, with the objective of avoiding the risk of transmission so as to allow for travel and economic engagement.”
4. Wide shot, journalists (under soundbite)
5. Med shot, journalist asking question
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesperson for the Secretary-General, United Nations:
(Begins under cutaway) “We need to be guided by the science. For our part, we are guided by our expert colleagues at WHO. And I think if you look at what they have said is that there is still a lot of studies to be done on transmissibility, the severity of the disease, and the issues of the vaccines. What the Secretary-General is saying is that we think there are more science-based solutions: increased testing, and even if people need to go into quarantine. But blanket barring of certain citizens, we feel, is a form of collective punishment in a way.”
7. Med shot, journalist asking question
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesperson for the Secretary-General, United Nations:
“He believes that those countries that have the financial resources, that have the production capabilities, could have done and could do a lot more. I think as you will recall, I think he left the G20 in a way where he said his dreams were not crushed, but his hopes were not realized.”
9. Wide shot, spokesperson at podium
STORYLINE
In a statement read by his spokesperson, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the people of Africa “cannot be blamed for the immorally low level of vaccinations available on the continent – and they should not be penalized for identifying and sharing crucial science and health information with the world.”

At a press conference in New York today (29 Nov), UN spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric said the Secretary-General commended the Government and scientist and health community of South Africa for acting early to identify the emergence of a new COVID-19 variant. He said the UN chief was now “deeply concerned about the isolation of southern African countries due to new COVID-19 travel restrictions.”

Dujarric said, as Guterres and others have long warned, “low vaccine rates are a breeding ground for variants.” He said the Secretary-General appealed to all governments to consider repeated testing for travelers, together with other appropriate and truly effective measures, “with the objective of avoiding the risk of transmission so as to allow for travel and economic engagement.”

Asked what else could be done to contain the variant, Dujarric said, “We need to be guided by the science. For our part, we are guided by our expert colleagues at WHO. And I think if you look at what they have said is that there is still a lot of studies to be done on transmissibility, the severity of the disease, and the issues of the vaccines. What the Secretary-General is saying is that we think there are more science-based solutions: increased testing, and even if people need to go into quarantine. But blanket barring of certain citizens, we feel, is a form of collective punishment in a way.”

Dujarric said the Secretary-General believes that the countries that have the financial resources and the production capabilities “could have done and could do a lot more.” He said Guterres left the G20 meeting “in a way where he said his dreams were not crushed, but his hopes were not realized.”
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