UN / GULF OF GUINEA PIRACY

22-Nov-2022 00:03:26
A top United Nations official for Africa told the Security Council that pirate groups in the Gulf of Guinea “are adapting to changing dynamics both at sea and in coastal areas” and said criminal networks may be shifting to “less risky and more profitable” activities. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / GULF OF GUINEA PIRACY
TRT: 03:26
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 NOVEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UN Headquarters

22 NOVEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Various shots, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Martha Ama Akyaa Pobee, Assistant Secretary-General for Africa in the Departments of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs (DPPA) and Peace Operations (DPO):
“Pirate groups are adapting to changing dynamics both at sea and in coastal areas. In this respect, the recent decrease in instances of piracy may in part be attributable to the shift by criminal networks to other forms of maritime and riverine crime, such as oil bunkering and theft, which they likely view as both less risky and more profitable.”
4. Wide shot, Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“The threat of piracy has cost the region lives, stability, and over 1.9 billion dollars in financial losses every year. The report of the Secretary-General that is being presented today reflects a moment of opportunity in our fight against this threat. The substantial decrease in piracy incidents and victims in the Gulf of Guinea this year, particularly for kidnapping for ransom, is a welcome result of many years of work, including in the context of the Yaoundé Maritime Security Architecture. At sea, there are more naval patrols and stronger cooperation between regional navies, backed by navies from outside the region who have deployed assets, creating a more secure maritime environment.”
6. Wide shot, Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Florentina Adenike Ukonga, Executive Secretary, Gulf of Guinea Commission:
“To maintain and increase the level of calm, peace and security that have so far been achieved, the states of the region, the regional organizations, the international organizations, have to intensify their efforts to continue the actions that have produced these heart-warming results. Criminality at sea begins on land, hence the need (inaudible) on land to discourage criminality at sea.”
8. Wide shot, Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Commander Nura Abdullahi Yakubu, Maritime Planning Officer, African Union Commission:
“The commitment of some countries within the Gulf of Guinea to establish the Combined Maritime Task Force for the Gulf of Guinea stems from the common desire to address the current security fragilities and stabilize the region to facilitate trade on the realization of their full developmental potentials. It also acknowledges the need for the countries to take responsibilities for the current situation with respect to the obligations on the original continental and international laws and conventions.”
10. Wide shot, Council
11. Wide shot, ambassadors at stakeout mic
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Harold Agyeman, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Ghana:
“Addressing piracy and armed robbery at sea is important for both the regional economy and stability and for the safety of seafarers. Notably, acts of piracy and armed robberies at sea in the Gulf of Guinea have halved from 27 cases in the first two quarters of 2021 to thirteen this year. This progress is largely thanks to leadership by regional countries. Nigeria's Deep Blue project is one such example. Many countries including Council members, Ghana, and Gabon also implemented important new regulations and laws.”
13. Pan right, Ambassadors walk away
STORYLINE
A top United Nations official for Africa today (22 Nov) told the Security Council that pirate groups in the Gulf of Guinea “are adapting to changing dynamics both at sea and in coastal areas” and said criminal networks may be shifting to “less risky and more profitable” activities.

Martha Ama Akyaa Pobee, who is the Assistant Secretary-General for Africa in the Departments of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs (DPPA) and Peace Operations (DPO) was presenting the Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation and Root Causes of Piracy and Armed Robbery at Sea in the Gulf of Guinea.

Akyaa Pobee said, “the recent decrease in instances of piracy may in part be attributable to the shift by criminal networks to other forms of maritime and riverine crime, such as oil bunkering and theft, which they likely view as both less risky and more profitable.”

In her address to the Council, the Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Ghada Fathi Waly, said, “the threat of piracy has cost the region lives, stability, and over 1.9 billion dollars in financial losses every year.”

The report of the Secretary-General, Fathi Waly said, “reflects a moment of opportunity in our fight against this threat.”

She said, “the substantial decrease in piracy incidents and victims in the Gulf of Guinea this year, particularly for kidnapping for ransom, is a welcome result of many years of work, including in the context of the Yaoundé Maritime Security Architecture.”

The UNODC official explained that “there are more naval patrols and stronger cooperation between regional navies, backed by navies from outside the region who have deployed assets, creating a more secure maritime environment.”

The Executive Secretary of the Gulf of Guinea Commission, Florentina Adenike Ukonga, said, “to maintain and increase the level of calm, peace and security that have so far been achieved, the states of the region, the regional organizations, the international organizations, have to intensify their efforts to continue the actions that have produced these heart-warming results.”

For his part, the Maritime Planning Officer of the African Union Commission, Commander Nura Abdullahi Yakubu, said, “the commitment of some countries within the Gulf of Guinea to establish the Combined Maritime Task Force for the Gulf of Guinea stems from the common desire to address the current security fragilities and stabilize the region to facilitate trade on the realization of their full developmental potentials.”

Outside the Council, the ambassadors of Norway, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, and Germany gave a joint statement. Ghana’s Ambassador Harold Agyeman said, “addressing piracy and armed robbery at sea is important for both the regional economy and stability and for the safety of seafarers. Notably, acts of piracy and armed robberies at sea in the Gulf of Guinea have halved from 27 cases in the first two quarters of 2021 to thirteen this year. This progress is largely thanks to leadership by regional countries. Nigeria's Deep Blue project is one such example. Many countries including Council members, Ghana, and Gabon also implemented important new regulations and laws.”

A multinational maritime exercise, “Grand African NEMO 2022” was jointly organized by the Interregional Coordination Centre (ICC) in Yaoundé and the French Navy from 11 to 18 October this year. The exercise covered a wide area stretching from Senegal to Angola and involved 17 of the 19 countries bordering the Gulf of Guinea as well as eight international partners.
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unifeed221122f
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